Xavier University of Louisiana Library Blog

Library news and tools you can use.

usnatarchivesexhibits:

Constitution of the United States

Item From: General Records of the United States Government. (05/14/1787- 09/17/1787)

The Federal Convention convened on May 14, 1787 in Philadelphia’s Independence Hall to revise the problematic Articles of Confederation. Since only two states had delegations present, any substantive debate was postponed until a quorum of seven states was attained on May 25th. After exhaustive deliberation well into the middle of June, the Convention concluded that the Articles were not salvageable and needed to be replaced with something that represented their collective interests while ensuring their continued independence.

Through subsequent closed sessions, the delegates continually debated, drafted and redrafted the articles of this new Constitution until it resembled the one we have today. The main points of contention were how much power was apportioned to the Federal Government, how many Congressional representatives were allotted to each state, and whether these representatives would be directly elected by their constituents or appointed by their state legislatures.

This new Constitution was the cumulative result of many minds coming together to conceptualize and debate the future course of the country. Through subsequent generations it has been amended and reinterpreted many times, but its continued success stems from adherence to these early promises of representation and compromise.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/DQ6Y

(via todaysdocument)

September 6 is National Read a Book Day

Why not stop in and browse our display of new books on the first floor? Not sure what you want to read? Search our new and improved catalog for regular print and e-books.

Trying to locate a hard-to-find book? Check WorldCat to see which area libraries (Xavier and others) own it.

Want some good, free e-books? Check out Project Gutenberg and Open Library.

[Image: Jacob Lawrence, The Library (1960). Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.]

Dr. Norman C. Francis, the nation’s longest serving university president, announced that he plans to retire as president of Xavier University, effective June 30, 2015.

XU Library Resource Center goes live with SirsiDynix Symphony!

After 26 years working with VTLS and the VIRTUA Integrated Library System, the Library Resource Center forged a new partnership with SirsiDynix and LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network. We are very excited about this new partnership which will help bring our library to a new level of efficient functionality.   The decision to migrate to SirsiDynix Symphony came after an assessment of cost, several discussions with colleagues, a review of the current literature, and a desire to increase networking opportunities within the state. 

Our legacy system, while serving us well for the past 26 years, came to a point in its life when it could no longer provide the level of functionality necessary to move us forward in a growing technological library world.  Our new integrated system boasts an intuitive task-oriented interface providing superior modules in the areas of circulation, cataloging, and statistical reporting.  The online catalog component of the new system allows for easy patron access to our electronic materials and to their library accounts; which will overall aid them in finding eResources, renewing materials, and viewing overdue library bills.  Additionally, SirsiDynix is currently in the process of developing a cloud-based interface which will allow staff to increase visibility and service by connecting to the system from virtually anywhere. 

After about six months of negotiations, policy building, data migration and training, the Library went live in the new system on May 29, 2014! Throughout the process we experienced a wonderful collaboration between SirsiDynix, LOUIS, Campus ITC and library personnel. We look forward to growing with our new partnerships and further expanding the services that we can provide to the greater XULA community.

Click here to start exploring the new and improved library catalog.

Freedom Summer: Study and Teaching Resources

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer, a civil rights campaign initiated by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the Congress for Racial Equality to press for African-American voting rights in Mississippi. The activities of Freedom Summer — and their backlash — put civil rights issues in the national spotlight, culminating in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Students and faculty alike will be interested in the Wisconsin Historical Society’s digital collection of documents related to Freedom Summer: over 30,000 pages of organization records, personal papers of movement leaders, racist propaganda examples, diaries, images, newsletters, and much more. Also included are extensive resources for teachers and links to other resources on Freedom Summer.

(Photo: George Raymond, Jr. a CoRE activist from New Orleans. Raymond was arrested for his participation in the Freedom Rides and for voter registration activity during Freedom Summer. Source: Mississippi Dept. of Archives & History, via Wikimedia Commons.)

congressarchives:

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Equal treatment of all Americans, regardless of race, was a major debate for decades in the U.S. Congress. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy urged Congress to take action. Passage of the act was not easy. We’ll be exploring some of the key moments for the Civil Rights Act throughout the day.
On June 19, 1964, the Senate passed the Civil Right Act of 1964, 73 to 27. The House passed the amended bill on July 2, 289 to 126.
The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson just a few hours after House approval on July 2. The act outlawed segregation in businesses such as theaters, restaurants, and hotels. It banned discriminatory practices in employment and education. Title VII of the act created the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to implement the law.
Roll Call Tally on Civil Rights Act 1964, 6/19/1964, Records of the U.S. Senate

congressarchives:

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Equal treatment of all Americans, regardless of race, was a major debate for decades in the U.S. Congress. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy urged Congress to take action. Passage of the act was not easy. We’ll be exploring some of the key moments for the Civil Rights Act throughout the day.

On June 19, 1964, the Senate passed the Civil Right Act of 1964, 73 to 27. The House passed the amended bill on July 2, 289 to 126.

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson just a few hours after House approval on July 2. The act outlawed segregation in businesses such as theaters, restaurants, and hotels. It banned discriminatory practices in employment and education. Title VII of the act created the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to implement the law.

Roll Call Tally on Civil Rights Act 1964, 6/19/1964, Records of the U.S. Senate

(via todaysdocument)

Study Break Suggestions for April 2014

When you break from studying this weekend, try to visit the Contemporary Arts Center (CAC) located in the Warehouse District at 900 Camp Street.  The current exhibition has everyone in New Orleans excited about art. It’s titled 30 Americans and shows the work of 30 prominent African American artists from the past three decades.  Before heading over to the museum, you can visit the library to read up on featured artists Kehinde Wiley, Wangechi Mutu, Carrie Mae Weems, Lorna Simpson and Kara Walker.  Some of these artists are also featured on the Art 21 DVD available for viewing in the Media Center on the fourth floor of the library.

CAC is open from 11AM until 5PM on Saturday and Sunday.  Admission for students is only $6.00 so don’t forget to take your X-Card.  Also, Louisiana residents get in free on Sundays with their Louisiana driver’s license or state ID card.

For more information see the CAC website at http://cacno.org/

April is National Poetry Month!

(Vasiliy Tropinin, Portrait of Alexander Pushkin, 1827.)

Xavier library users may already know about poetry anthologies on the shelves and in our databases, but there are also plenty of great free, online resources accessible to anyone with no logins required. Check out these sites:

The Poetry and Literature Center at the Library of Congress: including information on past and present Poet Laurates. 

Poetry Foundation: from the publishers of Poetry magazine.

Poets.org: Academy of American Poets’ official website.

Representative Poetry Onlinea web anthology of 4,800 poems in English and French by over 700 poets spanning 1400 years.

Unleash your inner orator!

A camera crew will be in the library to stage and film readings of the Gettysburg Address next Thursday, February 27 at 2:00. The readings are being filmed as part of an audience participation project in conjunction with Ken Burns’ upcoming documentary The Address. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to participate. You can read more about the project here:
http://www.learntheaddress.org/